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Roundabout Rumors Are Not True.

 
Summer 17 
 
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Roundabout Rumors Are Not True.

Rumors about the roundabout in south Alexandria continue to swirl.
 
There's talk that it will have to be "torn out" and redone because it's "too small" for trucks to navigate.
We talked with the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) leaders who are in charge of the project to get the straight scoop.
 
The bottom-line: The rumors are not true.
Let's start with the too-small-for-trucks claim.
Actually, the roundabout is one of the largest single-lane — if not the largest — on the MnDOT system, according to Jerimiah Moerke, public affairs spokesperson for MnDOT District 4.
"It was designed to handle the extra large loads that occasionally use Highway 29," Moerke said.
Moerke added that it's common practice for big semitrailers to "ride up" onto the concrete truck apron in the center.
"That's what it's designed for," he said. "Drivers hauling regular-sized loads who are familiar with roundabouts can navigate it without going into the center. As local drivers get more accustomed to it, they will feel more comfortable with it, too."
The rumor that the roundabout will have to be completely redone is also false.
"You will see a little bit of work this spring near the roundabout — basically any parts that look unfinished," Moerke said.
He explained that this is a small part of the project that still has temporary pavement in place.
"The contractor needs to remove and replace the pavement on the southbound side of the roundabout," Moerke said. "They just ran out of time last year.
"If you look closely, the transition between the concrete and pavement isn't what it should be," Moeke added. "In addition, the center island needs to be completed and landscaped, and we may make some additional adjustments to the signs."
Questions about the roundabout were expected and MnDOT appreciates the feedback from the public, Moerke said.
"Roundabouts are a relatively new traffic control feature in Minnesota," he said. "When we hear the occasional complaint or concern about them, we do look into the issue seriously and make adjustments, if feasible, and take the issue into consideration in future roundabout designs."

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